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Weekend Roundup email newsletter: March 15 edition

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Our Weekend Roundup is released on Sunday mornings during the school year and features an engaging rundown of the news from the previous week in the form of a briefing. It also includes editors’ picks from our Arts & Life, Grind, Opinions and Satire sections, as well as a list of upcoming events to watch out for in the next week. Subscribe here to receive emails like this.


 
 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 
Main Quad
 
For the latest coronavirus updates, follow along with The Daily’s live blog, which includes a map of confirmed cases and a timeline of Stanford’s response to the outbreak.

Amid escalating local and national coronavirus emergencies, Stanford on Tuesday announced that spring quarter courses would be virtual “until further notice” and on Friday told students that nearly all undergraduates must leave campus by Wednesday at 5 p.m.

The University’s Friday announcement came after the first Stanford undergraduate tested positive for coronavirus, and after new Santa Clara County restrictions on gatherings made it more difficult for the University to continue operating its dining halls.

The few undergraduates who may stay on campus — primarily international students who cannot go home, students with known health or safety risks and students who are homeless — will face a very different spring quarter. According to the University, there will be limited dining options, no programing for students and no gyms or recreational centers open.

In the final weeks of winter quarter, coronavirus has already changed nearly everything about undergraduate life. Students zoomed their way through their first week of online classes, and all undergraduate final exams, although not all projects, have been made optional. The virus has also taken a toll on the service workers on the front lines of the University’s response, leading union leaders and student activists to call on Stanford for increased worker protections.
 
The Home of Champions at Stanford
 
On Wednesday night, men’s basketball fell to Cal in the first round of the Pac-12 tournament, in what might have also been the final Stanford sporting event of the 2019-20 season: The next day, Stanford cancelled all sports seasons and suspended its athletic activities indefinitely in response to the continued spread of coronavirus across the country. This cut the season short for nearly two dozen Cardinal sports teams.

Earlier on Thursday, the NCAA cancelled all winter and spring championships, dashing tournament hopes for women’s basketball and swimming and diving in particular.

Professional leagues such as the NBA, MLB and NHL have all suspended their seasons.
 
A street in the Buena Vista Mobile Park
 
An effort to catalogue historical assets in Stanford’s San Juan Residential District is raising questions over whether the University should prioritize history or affordability. On one side of the debate is a group of faculty members and their family members who want to preserve the historic character of their neighborhood. They oppose Stanford’s plan to tear down two houses and build seven new ones in their place. But other faculty worry that a historical designation would interfere with the University’s ability to build more sustainable, high-volume faculty and staff housing.

Housing dilemmas aren’t limited to the San Juan Residential District. As median incomes in Silicon Valley continue to rise, affording a place to live is becoming increasingly difficult, as discussed in this Daily deep dive on affordable housing in Santa Clara County.

On campus, grad students are worried about rent, too, raising concerns over raised prices in the newly developed Escondido Village Graduate Residences.
 

 
Leanna Lewis ’23
 
In the Opinions section, a number of writers weighed in on Stanford’s and students’ responses to coronavirus. Bryce Tuttle asked seniors to sacrifice their senior spring to help flatten the curve, while Ravi Veriah Jacques countered that sending students across the country from one of the centers of the outbreak might not be such a good idea. The Daily’s Editorial Board had a busy week, too, arguing for more transparency in the University’s response to coronavirus, increased protections for campus workers, adherence to the University’s guidance on spring quarter housing and optional finals.

In Arts & Life, Patricia Wei profiled Leanna Lewis, pictured above, a student filmmaker fighting for representation of Native women in media. In Satire, Lana Tleimat reported on “a state of public emergency” after Stanford ran out of Wi-Fi. And in The Grind, Ellie Utter mused on memory and loss — on holding onto Stanford as we leave it behind.
 

 
As a result of the University’s restrictions on public gatherings, The Daily is not providing an events calendar until in-person classes resume.
 
Additionally, as students move off campus, The Daily — an organization led and staffed primarily by undergraduates — is suspending its print edition. We may resume production of the print edition if/when in-person classes resume in spring.
 
That’s all for this roundup. For more from The Daily, you can visit our website and subscribe to our daily email digest as we continue to report from off campus.
 
 
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