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Fuad Shennib, Ph.D. student at Stanford business school, dies at 30

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Fuad Shennib, a Ph.D. student at the Graduate School of Business who studied judgment and decision making, died on May 2. He was 30.

His death was confirmed by his father, Adnan Shennib, who described his son as gregarious, hardworking and devoted to his studies at Stanford.

“He loved Stanford,” Adnan said. “Stanford was his life the last two years. He was very dedicated to his research. He worked very hard, long hours, day and night, weekends, all the time. He loved his professors.”

“His departure was a shock and a big loss to the family,” Adnan added.

Fuad, who earned a bachelor’s degree from University of California, Berkeley and a master’s from Cambridge University, loved to travel and had friends worldwide, Adnan said. Fuad’s hobbies also included marathon running and mountain climbing.  

Graduate School of Business Dean Jonathan Levin announced the death on May 3, describing Fuad as “insightful, thoughtful and creative — a mentor for others.”

“It is a profound tragedy to suffer the death of a student who is poised to accomplish great things,” Levin wrote. “This loss comes at a time when we have a heightened sense of the fragility and value of human life. We stand together as a community in mourning Fuad’s passing and celebrating his life.”

Before arriving at Stanford, Fuad worked at Kapronasia, Google and the Cambridge Development Initiative. He also spent two years as a fellow associate at Malaysia Blue Ocean Strategy Institute, where he worked with the Malaysian government to support economic development and public well-being, according to his profile on LinkedIn. 

Vice Provost for Student Affairs Susie Brubaker-Cole informed faculty, staff and students of Fuad’s death in an announcement on May 6.

“Each student touches many lives, and we are all part of one community,” Brubaker-Cole wrote. “It is terribly saddening to lose someone at such a young age.”  

Fuad’s death was the second announced by the University last week. Brubaker-Cole informed students, staff and faculty on May 5 of the death of Langston Wesley ’20 on April 4. 

Both Levin and Brubaker-Cole encouraged members of the Stanford community seeking support to reach out to Stanford Counseling and Psychological Services, the Graduate Life Office or the Graduate School of Business student program offices.

Charlie Curnin contributed reporting.

Contact Anupriya Dwivedi at adwivedi ‘at’ stanford.edu.

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Anupriya is a Masters student at the Graduate School of Business at Stanford. Similar to her portfolio life, career and interests, her contributions to the Daily are also a motley combination of Arts & Life (Music, Culture and Theatre), Sports Photography and some News. Anupriya has moved to Stanford from Switzerland, where she was working as a strategy consultant. She has also been a feature writer for The Times of India, has published thought pieces on banking, culture and strategy and even won a National science fiction writing competition. Her writing wildly oscillates between the formality derived from her academic life (Neuroscience at the University of Oxford as a Commonwealth Scholar) and an irreverence from her culture soaked lifestyle in London and Zurich. When she's not attending theatre premieres in Palo Alto, or buried in GSB work, she also contributes to popular science journals or writes geeky policy memos.