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Will Ferrer
Will Ferrer is a junior at Stanford, a current member of The Editorial Board, and a former Executive Editor, Managing Editor of Arts & Life, and Film/TV Desk Editor at The Stanford Daily. Will is double-majoring in Film and Media Studies and English Literature. After a childhood spent nabbing R-rated movies from his brother’s collection, Will is annoyingly passionate about all things entertainment. Heralding from Northern Virginia, Will abhors Maryland drivers and enjoys saying he is “essentially from Washington DC.” Contact him at [email protected]

Why The Daily matters: We’re not Faulkner, but we’re worth the read

When asked, I’ve provided a number of explanations for my joining The Daily. I was looking for friends; I flirted with journalism pre-college but wanted to double down at Stanford; I was under the impression that engaging in extracurricular activities would make me attractive to employers (here, I was sorely mistaken; during the first job…

Keeping catastrophe ‘At Bay’

The first thing you’ll notice about “At Bay,” a web-series from student filmmakers Jay Moon ’17 and Katie Adams ’17, is that it doesn’t feel like a Stanford production. There is, of course, the occasional and expected appearance of Stanford landmarks (Hoover Tower, Toyon Hall, that outdoor patio at Arrillaga that I’m fairly certain is…

On the The Stanford Daily Magazine: A Letter from the editor

I’ve typed the words “falls short” more times than I’ve flossed. Of course, my flossing regimen hasn’t set the highest bar for clearing, but, nonetheless, as a former three-term arts editor, “falls short” was once my default print headline. (In print, space proves minimal and patience, scarce) “Birdman” was pretentious? Headline: “’Birdman’ falls short.” “Into…

Theater review: ‘Twelve Angry Men’ marred by lack of subtlety

Reginald Rose’s “Twelve Angry Men” is many things. It’s a scathing critique of the nation’s judicial system, it’s a gut-wrenching investigation of prejudice (racial and otherwise) and it’s a nuanced portrait of toxic masculinity – of this rough-and-tumble-brawn-before-brains American life. Riveting as it is timeless, it’s a show that’s been staged time and time again,…

Making up my dang mind about ‘Batman v. Superman’

After sacrificing two and a half hours of my precious time to watch Ben Affleck (Batman) and Henry Cavill (Superman) punch and shoot things, I've emerged from the darkness of Snyder's psyche, both confused and inspired. You see, I hate "Batman v. Superman," but I also kind of love it.

Television review: ‘The Catch’ is glorious garbage

Queen of the ABC Thursday night block, executive producer Shonda Rhimes backs a very specific breed of television. Stuffed with dramatic reveals, sexual intrigue and Sorkin-speed dialogue delivered by a parade of Hot twenty-somethings, Rhimes’ series are often exercises in diet prestige or, perhaps more aptly, “serious” soap opera. “Grey’s Anatomy,” “Scandal,” “How to Get Away with Murder” ("HTGAWM"): Her shows are far from challenging, yet they never fail to entertain. And “The Catch,” the latest from television's most powerful EP, is no exception. Deliriously fun and terrifying slick, it’s a prime-time juggernaut in the making.

Film review: ‘Kung Fu Panda 3’ kicks butt

There are some things I never thought I’d say like, “Jack Black is in a good movie” and “that movie is ‘Kung Fu Panda 3.’” But alas, here I sit. Today, the pretentious film critic is humbled before corporate America. Today, the pretentious film critic, who calls himself a “critic” but really just enjoys making…

Will’s top five films of 2015

From “Carol” to “Sicario,” here are film critic Will Ferrer’s picks for 2015’s best. “Carol” “Carol” is a film that is made in the details: the color of the eponymous Ms. Aird’s (Cate Blanchett) nails as department store worker Therese Belivet (Rooney Mara) floats into her life and away again; the ecstatic quasi-maternal whisper (“I…

Film review: In ‘Spectre,’ Bond grows old, refuses to grow up

James Bond is classic as they come; a character so iconic his movies needn’t bear his name. As the world’s most recognizable agent, 007 plays by his own rules (guns, girls, gadgets, etc…). Bond is a brand, a flavor of entertainment grounded in a decades-long cinematic narrative, yet resolved to produce something inventive and spectacular. From this…

Film review: ‘Steve Jobs’ weaves excellent tale of fatherhood, redemption

“The Social Network” was iconoclastic, deconstructing — if not destroying — the rags-to-riches narrative of Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg. By contrast, Danny Boyle’s “Steve Jobs,” also penned by “West Wing” scribe Aaron Sorkin, is downright exultant: Here, “Steve Jobs” is torn to shreds, beaten and bruised by demonstrations of cruelty and wickedness; and yet, by…

Television review: The CW’s ‘Crazy Ex-Girlfriend’ shows promise

There’s a scene in Marc Webb’s remarkable “500 Days of Summer” in which a young Joseph Gordon-Levitt softly sways through the streets of Los Angeles as Hall and Oates belt “You Make My Dreams Come True” on the soundtrack. It’s really a lovely scene – both for its eccentricity and its adorable seize-the-day happy-go-lucky magnetism. Animated…

Television review: CBS’ ‘Code Black’ needs CPR, stat

More than two decades ago, “E.R.” burst from the mind of Michael Crichton (“Jurassic Park”) onto the small screen and, over a record-breaking 15-season run, proved unparalleled in its portrayal of the personal and professional lives of medical practitioners. Burdened with the urgency inherent in its name, “E.R.” thrived on a sweeping Steadicam aesthetic that…

The ‘Fuller House’ dilemma: Netflix positions reboot for failure

So commonplace are reboots and spin-offs that these days, complaining about their market dominance has evolved into a cliché. Nonetheless, those who warn against the revisiting of established properties make a relatively convincing case: When it comes to said revivals, the question is always whether or not it’s possible, and never whether or not doing so is actually…

Emmys 2015 offers few surprises despite historic wins

Last night, television’s finest converged upon LA’s Microsoft Theater for what would soon prove to be an evening of stupefying predictability. With Andy Samberg at the helm, the awards show kicked off with a so-so monologue replete with vaguely controversial humor – including jabs at Bill Cosby and Donald Trump – before transitioning into yet…

TIFF report card 2015: Grading this year’s films

Celebrating its 40th anniversary this year, the Toronto International Film Festival (TIFF) continues to be the “festival of festivals:” a ragbag of red carpet affairs and quiet independent flicks that thrives on an unwavering dedication to the filmgoers that keep this industry alive. Praised, over the last decade, for its incomparable slate — often packed with…

‘7 Days in Hell’ is violently inappropriate, shamefully good

Full frontal nudity, bawdy sex jokes and unforgettable cameos reign supreme in “7 Days in Hell,” a faux docudrama starring “Brooklyn Nine Nine”’s Andy Sandberg and the “indubitably” British Kit Harrington (best known for playing Jon Snow on HBO’s “Game of Thrones”) as dueling tennis prodigies ferociously locked in a week-long duel to conquer inner…

Pixar’s whip-smart ‘Inside Out’ tackles depression, fails to address veiled sexism

“Cars 2,” “Brave,” “Monsters University”: Ever since the release of the simply exceptional “Toy Story 3,” the once-great Pixar has suffered from a particularly resilient strain of mediocrity and pedestrianism. Fortunately for the Silicon Valley based studio, “Inside Out,” the latest creation from Pixar-virtuoso Peter Docter, marks a no-holds-barred return to form. Though hindered by some…

Director of Brian Wilson biopic ‘Love & Mercy’ talks being original, mental illness in film

After appearances at both the Toronto International Film Festival last September and the San Francisco International Film Festival this spring, Bill Pohlad’s directorial debut “Love & Mercy” finally hits theaters this Friday. Charting the life of Beach Boys’ frontman Brian Wilson, Pohlad’s vision is unique in that it unfolds in two distinct narrative threads. In…

Cardinal Studios’ first outing is promising though puzzling

The first official student work produced under the newly introduced Cardinal Studios banner, “Prisoner,” a short film directed by Becky Aydin (’18) and written by Alexander Kucy (’17), is both an immense victory for the campus film community and a bit of a disappointing first feature for Stanford’s only student-run production company. Searching for a profoundly impactful…

‘Mad Max: Fury Road’ is a brilliant exercise in lunacy

“Mad Max: Fury Road” is insane. So far beyond the realm of the typical, the latest installment in George Miller’s post-apocalyptic series can only be described as the deranged work of a genuine madman. Transcending the absurdity of previous installments, Miller’s “Fury Road” turns the crazy up to eleven, and fabricates a sumptuous Eden, packed with…
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